The Magic of Golden Memories – The New Indian Express

Express press service

Indian playback singer Harshdeep Kaur – she started learning music at the age of five – grew up giving auditions and participating in recording sessions in various parts of Delhi. She tells vividly that she made it a point to participate in all the music competitions that took place on Sundays. “These competitions gave me a lot of exposure and boosted my confidence,” says Harshdeep, who made her musical debut in Bollywood when she was in class 11. She lent her voice to the song Sajna Main Haari in Aapko Pehle Bhi Kahin by director Anubhav Sinha. Dekha Hai (2003).

While the 35-year-old moved to Mumbai with her family in 2004, her relationship with Delhi remains special. “Delhi is my hometown. It is also my father’s hometown. I spent all my childhood here; finished my studies here, which had a lot of impact on my life,” she shares. In this edition of ‘City on My Mind’, the singer recalls her time in the capital.

where it all started

It was Harshdeep’s father, Savinder Singh, who first identified her musical talent and helped her hone her skills over the years. He accompanied her to auditions and recording sessions when she was young. “Delhi has designated venues for music groups. It’s a bustling city,” says Harshdeep, who was a disciple of Indian classical musician Tejpal Singh – a member of the musical duo Singh Bandhus – and learned Western classical music and piano at the Delhi School of Music. “Delhi music school was in Chanakyapuri. It was a completely different culture. It was not like Delhi because there were mainly Western musicians there,” says Harshdeep, further adding that Delhi is a melting pot of several cultures. .

Harshdeep credits his impressive command of Hindi and Urdu – evident in his tracks – to his school upbringing. “Hindi pronunciation may seem like a basic thing, but it was because I studied at the New Era School that I had a good understanding of pronunciation and grammar. say “Are you from Delhi? Aapki hindi bahut acchi hai” [Your Hindi is impeccable].”

A city with a friendly atmosphere

“‘Dilli Dilwalon ki’ is a phrase that is true,” Harshdeep laughs mid-conversation. The singer recalls how, moving to Mumbai, she missed the “culture of togetherness and family” she experienced in the capital. “In Delhi, even the neighbors treat you like family. You know everyone in your mohalla [area]. This was initially missing when we moved to Mumbai. Although it has been over 15 years since Harshdeep has been in Mumbai, memories of Delhi are fresh in her mind – Gurudwara Bangla Sahib at Connaught Place, and the langar she savored here as a child; his father’s recurring visits to the office of All India Radio, Parliament Street; and more.

Delhi’s street food remains the highlight of Harshdeep’s time here. “Delhi has set very high standards in terms of food (laughs).” Among the many dishes and restaurants that are dear to him, the aloo tikkis at Sindhi Tikki Corner in Karol Bagh as a child are still his favorites. Speaking of her recent trip to Delhi, the singer concludes: “I was in town with my husband and my son. Taste [of aloo tikkis] is exactly the same. It took me back to my childhood. »

FAST FOUR

Favorite places to go out: Chanakyapuri
Favorite street food: Aloo tikki at Sindhi Tikki Corner, Karol Bagh
Favorite monument: Lotus Temple
Your take on Delhi: The people of Delhi, as they say “Yaaro ke yaar hotey hai” [are extremely friendly]

Indian playback singer Harshdeep Kaur – she started learning music at the age of five – grew up giving auditions and participating in recording sessions in various parts of Delhi. She tells vividly that she made it a point to participate in all the music competitions that took place on Sundays. “These competitions gave me a lot of exposure and boosted my confidence,” says Harshdeep, who made her musical debut in Bollywood when she was in class 11. She lent her voice to the song Sajna Main Haari in Aapko Pehle Bhi Kahin by director Anubhav Sinha. Dekha Hai (2003). While the 35-year-old moved to Mumbai with her family in 2004, her relationship with Delhi remains special. “Delhi is my hometown. It is also my father’s hometown. I spent all my childhood here; finished my studies here, which had a lot of impact on my life,” she shares. In this edition of ‘City on My Mind’, the singer recalls her time in the capital. Where it all began It was Harshdeep’s father, Savinder Singh, who first identified her musical talent and helped her hone her skills over the years. He accompanied her to auditions and recording sessions when she was young. “Delhi has designated venues for music groups. It’s a bustling city,” says Harshdeep, who was a disciple of Indian classical musician Tejpal Singh – a member of the musical duo Singh Bandhus – and learned Western classical music and piano at the Delhi School of Music. “Delhi music school was in Chanakyapuri. It was a completely different culture. It was not like Delhi because there were mainly Western musicians there,” says Harshdeep, further adding that Delhi is a melting pot of several cultures. Harshdeep credits his impressive command of Hindi and Urdu – evident in his tracks – to his school upbringing. “Hindi pronunciation may seem like a basic thing, but that’s because I studied at the New Era School that I had a good understanding of pronunciation and grammar. People keep saying ‘Are you from Delhi? Aapki hindi bahu acchi hai’ [Your Hindi is impeccable].” A city with a friendly atmosphere “’Dilli Dilwalon ki’ is a sentence that is true,” Harshdeep chuckles in the middle of the conversation. The singer recalls how, moving to Mumbai, she missed the “culture of togetherness and family” she experienced in the capital. “In Delhi, even the neighbors treat you like family. You know everyone in your mohalla [area]. This was initially missing when we moved to Mumbai. Although it has been over 15 years since Harshdeep has been in Mumbai, memories of Delhi are fresh in her mind – Gurudwara Bangla Sahib at Connaught Place, and the langar she savored here as a child; his father’s recurring visits to the office of All India Radio, Parliament Street; and more. Delhi’s street food remains the highlight of Harshdeep’s time here. “Delhi has set very high standards in terms of food (laughs).” Among the many dishes and restaurants that are dear to him, the aloo tikkis at Sindhi Tikki Corner in Karol Bagh as a child are still his favorites. Speaking of her recent trip to Delhi, the singer concludes: “I was in town with my husband and my son. Taste [of aloo tikkis] is exactly the same. It took me back to my childhood. FOUR RAPID Favorite places to hang out: Chanakyapuri Favorite street food: Aloo tikki at Sindhi Tikki Corner, Karol Bagh Favorite landmark: Lotus Temple Your perspective on Delhi: Delhi locals, as they say “Yaaro ke yaar hotey hai » [are extremely friendly]

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